Compression Coil

My backup costume is pretty much done!

Woot!

style

I figured I’d get the backup costume done as quickly as I could, but realistically this has been mulling around in my brain for awhile.

The flightsuit/jumpsuit got to me in April, I think. Maybe March, but a long time ago. I actually went to my local surplus/costume/knick-knack store, and the owner sized me up and said that I would probably fit well in the child’s extra large. Which worked out nearly perfectly!

Realistically though, when I found the adult flightsuits at the back of the store they were as tall as I was. So the child’s size made sense.

It’s a lightweight poly-cotton, and straight from the package it fit well in the shoulders, and the chest, etc. Even the length from the crotch to the hem was good. The problem was the four inches of extra torso length. Four inches!

back

It did take me three or four months to actually fix this. And to be perfectly honest, I might have gone a little too far, but it looks great when I’m standing. And I can deal with it pulling a bit when sitting. There aren’t sleeves to deal with after all.

Dancing

The patches are wonderful! I got them from Ebay, and here’s the teddy bear, and the heart/flower combo. You can get the combo of all three here…

I sewed them on using a normal back stitch, but around the teddy bear I also added some fake blanket stitching. Then I took a normal marker to draw on some Chinese characters. Luck and love, if I remember correctly…

shirt

I made the top using the Nettie pattern from Closet Case Files, like I do all my t-shirts, and this weird stretchy fabric. It’s rather plastic-y even for polyester… But it is very Kaylee!

The sandals are not nearly the same as Kaylee’s but I did make them! There will be more on those later this week though.

Add in some pigtail buns and my parasol, and it makes a pretty smashing Kaylee!

glamour

TARDIS Television (Purse)

Here we have a brief return of TARDIS Tuesday, where I would update you on my progress on my TARDIS costume.

full

And now I’ve got one of the my favorite ideas (and perhaps most clever part, though I should probably not be the judge of that) of the costume to share.

I was looking at the console one day, and thought, Hmm, I’m going to need a purse thing… Why not make it look a bit like the TV?

dial

So when I was working on the costume for Halloween (not last year, but the year before), I brought out the remainder of the pillowcases that I used for the “vest” or bolero thing, and worked with that.

uninterfaced

The original version had pretty much no extra support, with just the thin fabric from the pillowcase flatlined to the same canvas like fabric I used to make my knapsack.

It did it’s job well the one time I used it like that, for the actual Halloween it was intended for, but it wasn’t structured enough for my plans. And it was unlined.

inside

So I took it apart last weekend, and added stiff interfacing and a lining. The lining is from the taffeta I used on the skirt, so it’s a little stiff and won’t tolerate any stains. That I know from experience. But it’ll be nice to open it and feel pretty good about how the inside looks! Excepting the bridge portion… Don’t look at the bridge portion…meccano

The purse itself has two hooks, which hook into the Meccano ladder piece, and that ties onto the leather corset belt. I don’t have a finished pic of the interfaced version with the corset belt, but it’ll pop up soon!

Oh, and I glued a dial on the side for a handle, and to sell the TV angle a little more. I thought about how to make it spin, but gluing in place just seemed so much easier. And it was!

Claudia Vest, Mark 2

There’s no snazzy quote associated with this post, since I’ve used a lot of the ear and eye catching ones already…

Plus I’m writing this before bedtime to post in the morning, so searching or listening to episodes from more is not exactly going to happen… Because of that bedtime thing…

front

So just imagine some Claudia Donovan sass, if you will!

The first trial of this vest was made three years ago out of a lab coat that I bought when I was abroad, perhaps the cheesiest and flimsiest lab coat around. When I pulled it out again recently, I realized that there were large obvious pit stains. And it didn’t fit. And it had a normal zipper, not a separating one, since that was always something I wanted to change but forgot to.

So I decided it was time to start over.

wback

This version is based off of the old one, out of linen this time with some redrafting since I know how to make a collar and facing now. It’s fully interfaced, since the linen was a bit shifty.  When I tried it on, it was still really big, despite my redrafting efforts, so I took it in on the fly, with pinning while I was wearing it, because separating zippers are magical!

It’s now a bit snug, but I like the way it fits, and I’m planning on actually doing that exercise thing, now that the semester and most of the craziness that goes with it are complete. So it might be a little less snug by the end of the summer, and that’ll be good too!

lining

I took the old lining since I adore the fabric, and I think Claudia would too, and slapped it onto the new version. I had to fish out my scraps to add some length to the top and bottom, but I had saved all of them for this exact purpose. I whipstitched the lining on carefully, hiding the ends under the facing for a clean line.

side

This new version makes me really happy, since I was so sure this costume was already finished barring pictures, but since I’ve remade the vest, not only am I feeling better about the costume as a whole, but I’m now actually pushing to make the next pair or two of Ginger jeans, since they’re potentially going to round off the costume.

In the next week or two, I’m going to be announcing an exciting costume/fangirl/crazy thing I’m doing, so stay tuned for that!

open

TARDIS Hair and Makeup

When I was doing my makeup for my first TARDIS photoshoot in March, I was walking back and forth between my friend’s small bathroom with very little counter space and her living room with all the natural light, so I didn’t try hard to do anything too complicated.

front sideEven this doesn’t look too crazy, I guess.

I love the original photoshoot’s results, which you’ll see in a few weeks, but I think I can go more over the top. It is the TARDIS after all, and there’s nothing more over the top than Eleven’s.

back side hair

So this time, I did my best to replicate the hair (though I will use second day hair from now on, since I had washed it in the morning, and it was not easy to work with even by afternoon).

back filteredBasically, I twist the right side (which is nearer to my part), all the way around my head, and take half of the hair on the back on my head and combine these parts into a bun at the nape of my neck on the right side of my head. Then I twist the left side, careful to catch my bangs and secure them in the process, and twist again all the way around my head. This time, though, I wind the twist above the right side bun and turn it back, catching the ends between the bun twists. Then hair spray and add bobby pins until its relatively secure.

eyes closed

But I went crazier on the makeup this time, and I like it very much!

front s2

In case you’re wondering about the products, I’ll list them out here. If not, hope you’re having a lovely Tuesday!

productsFace: Ponds Luminous Finish BB+ Cream; Neutrogena 3-in-1 Concealer; Benefit Watt’s Up Highlighter; trestique Baby Blush Stick in Bora Bora Coral; NYC Translucent Pressed Powder; Mellow Bronzer

Eyes: Jesse’s Girl Eye Shadow Primer; ipsy’s NYX gold palette; Covergirl Golden Sunset palette; Mica Beauty Cream Eyeshadow in Bronze; Coastal Scents Eye Shadow in Mimosa and Deep Cantaloupe; Pixi by Petra Shades of Brow; an auburn eyebrow pencil, probably WetnWild; Benefit They’re Real Mascara; Starlooks Longwear Eye Pencil in Jet; theBalm Mr. Write (Now) in Jac; Sephora Jumbo Waterproof liner in Peacock Blue Shimmer

Lips: Ofra Lipliner in Wine; NARS Satin Lip Pencil in Rikugien

Brushes: Knockoff Beauty Blender, Royal and Langnickel Medium Eyeshader, Studio Basic’s Angled Eyeliner, Coastal Scent’s Travel Blush Brush; Real Techniques buffing brush; Coastal Scent’s BR-C-540; Coastal Scent’s BR-B-S03

side eyes

Bustle and Apron

In case you’ve missed the last few posts, I’m giving notes on my most recent costume, and anthropomorphic version of the inside of the 11th Doctor’s first TARDIS. I’ve posted about the bum pad, the petticoat, and the console skirt.

When I picked up the gold taffeta that starred in the skirt, I also picked up this dark gold taffeta. Originally it was planned to be a part of the skirt, so it would have been aqua: bright gold: dark gold: bright gold: aqua, etc. But I thought that might be a bit too busy, and it definitely would have complicated the “I made the skirt way too big” conundrum. Then when it came to the bustle, I decided it would be the best option.

otherside

Three years ago, when I started this concept, I had gotten this decaying silk (I’m pretty sure) gold fabric from a costume store in Cardiff. I thought it would be fitting, since we had just been to the Doctor Who Experience, and having something in the costume from Cardiff would make it even more special. That fabric would have been much too light for the bustle, I know now, so it will make an appearance later.

sidefront

The taffeta has enough body all on its own to hold up to bustling. I gathered it to the back of a waistband and attached it. Granted, I probably should’ve waited until I had the apron sorted as well, but I was not thinking clearly on day 4 of a marathon costume journey.

closeup

Then I decided to work on the apron, since that would determine how long down the sides the bustle could go. The apron is entirely made up of curtain fabric that I got from a grab bag. And I’ve got plenty more if I need it. Because this stuff will shrink down to nothing, so I got to stuff the bag really full. It has two layers, or technically three. The outer orange-y iridescent layer, the lattice layer, and then the orange layer on the inside again (though this one is folded from the first layer. Come to think of it, the lattice one might be a double layer as well. I wanted the apron to be soft, but hefty enough to allow for the nice folded texture.

front

I learned from this video that I should pleat upwards, which I used for both the apron and the bustle. I can attest that it really does give so much body to the garments that makes them so much better! And I got the idea to combine the apron and the bustle on the same waistband from this tutorial.

I fiddled around for awhile until I got the apron the way I like it, and then I pinned it to a ribbon hanging off the waistband on either side.

The bustle was equally as fiddly. I pleated the sides, and then I just fiddled until it looked less like a mushroom and more like a poufy cream puff. I attached these to more ribbons hanging down the back with some tacks.

side

The waistband closes on one side with a whole row of hooks and eyes. I’m planning on adding some buttons to add to the design, but buttonholes would never work with all this fabric, so the hook and eyes are there to stay. The other side has the bustle and the apron sewn together, for ease of putting the contraption on.

So that’s it for the skirts! We’re nearing the end of our journey. Next week I’ll tell you about the blouse I cobbled together, and perhaps either the TV purse, or the accessories. Or maybe just the blouse. It’ll depend on how busy I get, and whether I remember to prepare… I do have a field trip this weekend, so we’ll see how much I remember to do!

TARDIS Console Skirt

Now we’ve made it to the real meat of the costume. Last week, or rather two weeks go now that I’ve checked, you saw the petticoat, and the bum pad before that. This week we’re onto the skirts.

This gold polyester taffeta has been sitting in my stash for two years now. And this week I learned that even if I sneeze in its general direction, it will collect water stains. Also, its super easy to accidentally melt.

TARDIS skirt side

But back to the costume. In order to model it off of the console, I wanted 6 sections of gold divided by sections of light aqua.

TARDISconsolelink

Super scientifically I measured the base of the skirt (on the ground…with my flat tape) and divided it into six sections. Now, this ended up being too big, but we’ll get to that. I then decided I wanted the aqua sections to be about 3 inches wide, and divvied up the fabric.

TARDIS skirt back

When I saw how woodgie the aqua fabric was, I knew that I needed to not only back it with something, but back it with something solid, so I used the same taffeta for that as well. I cut the aqua 5 inches wide, and then gathered it every 10 inches or so, and basted it to the taffeta. I was using half inch seam allowances throughout, mostly so it would be easy to calculate the exact widths. I then realized that the skirt could use some extra texture, so I made wide pleats up three of the six panels, and centered one of them in the back.

TARDIS skirt front

Once the entire skirt was sewn up, it was a panel too wide, but I was determined to keep all six, so I left the back pleated one (which I had accidentally melted the bottom of anyway), and cut off 4 inches of each other panel.

It still ended up a bit wide, but it was easily handled by pleating, and the apron and bustle covered up most of the top of the skirt anyway!

TARDIS skirt zipped

I attached a waistband made out of the same taffeta (sense a theme?), and used a zipper to close it. It’s not a long zipper, so it’s still a smidge difficult to get on, but it works nicely. And it’s covered by the bustle anyways. If I knew it would be seen, I’d think of using a different closure, but it’s fine for this one!

Now, by this point I had spent nearly two days working on this skirt, when it was only supposed to take me one, and I hadn’t even touched the pleats on the bottom yet. I took a break to drape the apron and bustle and make the shirt. But it’s probably better that I did.

TARDIS skirt pleats

The break gave me time to buy some poster board, which I used to make a pleating board. It took nearly three hours to pleat enough to go all the way around the skirt. And I only almost melted the taffeta once.

There is always time to add extra trim, which is what I’ll be doing for the next month or so, since my daily life will be too busy to facilitate the extracurriculars. So tedious hand sewing could keep me on track! But that’s the skirt as it stood for the pictures that I’ve taken of the whole costume.

I’ll be back on Thursday to show you the bustle. Till then!